December6 , 2022

    Top Ten Mistakes of a New Homeschooler

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    Of all the traps you can fall into as a new homeschooler, there is one that stands out above all the rest as potentially the most destructive and the most joy-draining mistake you can make.

    Before I get into what that is, don’t lose heart if you discover you’ve been doing this all along. I think most of us are guilty of having done this to some extent in our homeschools- I know I have.

    Ready for the big disclosure? Okay. The biggest no-no you can run into as a new homeschooler is…

    Boxing yourself into a school model.

    Confused? Let me explain.

    If you’re new to this homeschooling thing, chances are you’ll do exactly what I did- draw on your own school experiences to help you to structure your homeschool. That’s perfectly understandable. As a society, we’ve been conditioned to believe that the school model is the only way to learn.

    What if I told you that’s just not true? What if I told you that your kids don’t have to raise their hands to ask questions? That you don’t have to start your day by taking attendance and saying the Pledge of Allegiance? That chewing gum is perfectly acceptable? That drawing on school work isn’t against the rules?

    What if I told you that you are in control- not the school down the street?

    Did that grab your attention? Let’s get started.

    10 Common Ways We Let the School Model Control Our Homeschool

    1. Schedules
      Just because schools divide their days into 7 or 8 periods of 45-55 minutes each doesn’t mean a homeschool must be run that way. What if I were to tell you that the whole routine of bells signaling the need to stop everything and move onto a new subject was instituted into the school system as a way to condition students to get used to working in factories? 

    Doesn’t seem so great now, does it?

    As the facilitator of your homeschool, how much time your children spend on any one subject is entirely up to you. Many homeschoolers, myself included, prefer to use routines to schedules because they are less restrictive and offer more flexibility. Whereas schedules offer specific starting and ending times for each individual subject, routines tend to focus more on what order things get done in than how much time is spent on them.

    2. Textbooks
    What’s the first thing most people think of when they think of learning? My guess is textbooks. Since most of us were brought up in the traditional school model, this is all we know.

    One thing you have to remember is schools use textbooks because they are “educating” a large number of students, so uniformity is a must. That just isn’t necessary for a homeschool setting.

    Kids are not cookie cutter molds of one another, and they shouldn’t be treated as such. Homeschooling gives you the unique opportunity to tailor your child’s learning to meet their needs. In a lot of cases, textbooks just aren’t the best way to reach your child, and that’s okay. There are so many other ways to learn.

    Do your research. Read about differing homeschool approaches. If textbooks are what your child truly needs, then by all means, use them.

    3. Grade Levels
    Grade levels are one of those things that are only in place to bring about uniformity among large groups of kids in a public school setting. It’s a way to group them, so to speak.

    Unless you are planning on sending your kids to school one day, consider focusing more on the needs of your child as an individual than on what an arbitrary timeline says they should be doing.

    4. 6-Hour Days
    Just because school days last 6-7 hours per day doesn’t mean your homeschool has to. There are so many things to factor in when considering why school takes so long, such as: 

    • Taking attendance
    • Bathroom breaks
    • Discipline issues with multiple students
    • School assemblies
    • Waiting for all students to complete an assignment
    • Collecting homework and going over it in class
    • Handing out the next day’s assignments

    And so on…

    All of these little interruptions add up to a lot of time- time that you as a homeschooler don’t need to worry about. What I’ve found in my experience with talking with other homeschoolers is that a typical homeschool day (for those who have let go of trying to make it last 6 hours) is about 2-4 hours long.

    That’s it!

    5.  School Calendars
    As a homeschooler, when you start and end your school year is entirely up to you. In fact, some homeschoolers don’t end their school year at all. They just keep going!

    If you want to start in July and take breaks every few weeks, go for it! If you want to just keep going, then do it! And if following the school calendar works for you, go right ahead!

    The key is to do what works for you and your family.

    6. School Hours
    As with the calendar year and the 6-hour days, don’t ever feel obligated to restrict your homeschool to between the hours of 8-3 because that’s when school is in session. You can start anytime you want, and you can end anytime you want.

    One of my favorite parts of homeschooling is that we can ease into our day by not starting until 10 am. My teens, on the other hand, do the vast majority of their work at night.

    I’m going to sound like I’m repeating myself, but it’s important to say it again- let your homeschool work for you, and stop worrying about following the school model. 

    7. School Timelines
    Similar to grade levels, school timelines are simply put in place for uniformity. Just because the 4th graders at the local elementary school are learning U.S. history doesn’t mean your homeschooled 4th grader has to. If he really wants to study ancient history, let him. If your daughter would rather learn about mammals than rocks and minerals, do it!

    Stop trying to fit the mold and make y