March25 , 2023

    Study: Faith is Good for the Brain

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    A new research found that faith has beneficial effects on the brain.

    According to an article by Italian science journalist Piero Bianucci, prayer and other experiences related to faith stimulate a part of the brain associated with strong, positive emotions, reports Catholic news website Aleteia.

    Bianucci’s article is published on Wellbeing, Health with Soul (BenEssere, la salute con l’anima) and is largely based on the book by French psychiatrist Boris Cyrulnik, Psychotherapy of God (Psychothérapie de Dieu, in French).

    Studies of brain circuitry do not reveal the existence of a ‘God zone’ or a ‘religion zone,’ but they do show that an environment structured by religious faith leaves a biological mark on our brain and makes it easier to re-discover feelings of ecstasy or transcendence acquired in infancy. —Piero Bianucci

    “Studies of brain circuitry do not reveal the existence of a ‘God zone’ or a ‘religion zone,’ but they do show that an environment structured by religious faith leaves a biological mark on our brain and makes it easier to re-discover feelings of ecstasy or transcendence acquired in infancy,” Bianucci wrote.

    When a child is exposed to daily prayers, going to church, or other faith-based activities, these imprint good emotions in the brain. These good experiences remain with the child, even if he/she loses faith in a higher power as an adult.