December4 , 2022

    French Christians to Use a New Version of the Lord’s Prayer

    Related

    Group Gives 10,000 Bibles to London’s Children

    The Trinitarian Bible Society announced that over 10,000 Bibles have been given to London schools within three years.

    ‘Praise the Lord!’ Ukrainian Christians Cheer Kherson Liberation

    Ukrainian Christians celebrate the liberation of Kherson with cheers of praise and thanksgiving, seven months after Russia occupied the city.

    JESUS Film Makes History, Now Translated in 2,000 Languages

    The JESUS film makes history as it is now translated into its 2,000th language making it the most translated film of all time.

    U.S. Renews Calls Against Blasphemy Laws

    The United States joined 15 countries in expressing concern over international blasphemy laws.

    Franklin Graham Attracts Record-breaking Audience in Italy

    More than 13,200 people gathered for an evangelical outreach led by Franklin Graham in Milan, Italy on October 29.

    Share

    French Christians have started using a revised version of the Lord’s Prayer on December 3, 2017, the first Sunday in Advent. Priests have asked churchgoers to recite the updated line: “Do not let us enter into temptation” (Ne nous laisse pas entrer en tentation), reports Catholic Herald.

    In the traditional translation of the prayer, French believers were saying “Do not submit us into temptation” (Ne nous soumets pas a la tentation). Many theologians have debated over this line, saying God should not be associated with sin. Instead, the sinner must hold the bigger responsibility for sin, and not God.

    While some approved of the change, some were critical about it. The national council of evangelicals of France, Conseil national des Évangéliques de France (CNEF), approved of removing the implication that God “is somehow responsible for temptation but it waters down God’s sovereignty.”

    When Jesus taught people about how they should pray, he was speaking in Aramaic. Apostles Matthew and Luke translated the Lord’s Prayer into Greek, which was then translated into Latin. The Latin version was recited in Catholic masses around the world.

    In 1966, the Second Vatican Council allowed the use of the nation’s native language when saying the Lord’s Prayer.

    Bishop Guy de Kerimel, the French Catholic Church’s chief liturgist, said the 1966 interpretation of the Lord’s Prayer was ambiguous. French bishops have decided in March to update the most popular prayer among Christians.

    According to The Guardian, the new version was slated to be introduced in 2019. The French clergy decided to adopt it earlier.

    French-language Protestant churches agreed with the change. It was already used in Africa and Belgium in June.

    While some approved of the change, some were critical about it. The national council of evangelicals of France, Conseil national des Évangéliques de France (CNEF), approved of removing the implication that God “is somehow responsible for temptation but it waters down God’s sovereignty.”

    Theologian and traditionalist French Catholic priest Guillaume de Tanoüarn said “faith is a struggle” and doesn’t spring from “a world of metaphysical teddy bears.”

    Sources:
    Catholic Herald
    The Telegraph

    spot_img