November27 , 2022

    8 Practical Steps to Homeschooling a Child with ADHD

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    Homeschooling and ADHD.

    Can the two go together? As the mom of one child officially diagnosed with ADHD and a few others I suspect may have it, I’m going to answer that question with a big, resounding YES.

    Not only can they go together, in fact, but I truly believe that it is the absolute best option for any child with this condition.

    Let’s face it. The traditional school setting simply isn’t set up for children who have excess energy. As it happens, it just may be the antithesis of what these children need.

    Shall we take a look?

    Long, drawn-out lessons
    No time to “let loose”
    Assignments that don’t take into consideration a child’s learning style
    Few, if any, breaks
    6-7 hours of being seated with very few reprieves


    It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that these are nightmarish conditions for any child, let alone one having ADD or ADHD.

    While it can be pretty simple to figure out that traditional schooling isn’t the way to go for these kids, that doesn’t make it any less scary for those of us who decide to take matters- and our children’s educations- into our own hands.

    After homeschooling my large crew for the past nine years- including my son with ADHD- through trial and error I’ve come upon some practical tips for homeschooling children with excess energy (to put it mildly) that I’m going to share with you today.

    8 Steps to Homeschooling Your ADHD Child

    1. Incorporate your child’s interests.
    I know, I know. You’ve seen this in just about every homeschooling post known to man, but it is crucial when you have a child who learns differently.

    I remember back when my son was still in school, he had a learning support teacher who helped him with reading. One day she excitedly came up to me with news of a breakthrough:

    “Good news! I’ve discovered today that if I let your son read a book about something he’s interested in, his comprehension skyrockets! Today he read a book on skateboarding, and he understood it perfectly!”

    I stood there dumbfounded because I couldn’t quite understand how that wouldn’t have been obvious from the very beginning, but there it is.

    Kids learn infinitely better when they are interested- especially kids with ADHD.

    And I didn’t even need a teaching degree to figure it out.

    2. Keep their lessons short.
    Think of it this way- it’s so much more effective to get a good 10-15 minutes of your child’s undivided attention than 45 minutes of them struggling to sit still and remember what it is you’ve been going on and on about.

    Be aware of what your child can handle, and use that to your advantage.

    3. Incorporate movement and hands-on activities.
    Now that your child is no longer in a traditional school setting, reap the benefits of having the freedom to let your child move!

    Take lessons outside and on the trampoline. Go on nature hikes and to the creek for science. Keep your kitchen stocked with ingredients for kitchen chemistry experiments. Bake a cake to delve into fractions.

    Learning doesn’t have to come from textbooks!

    4. Follow your child’s cues.
    Although hands-on activities can be a great way for a child with ADHD to learn, watch for signs when something is too much.

    Several years back, I used to have my son (and his siblings) do lapbooking. Since my son enjoyed working with his hands, I thought it would be perfect for him.

    I was wrong.

    You see, in addition to liking hands-on activities, he was (and still is) a bit of a perfectionist. As he would work in his lapbooks, I used to watch him